Nov 042013
 

 

Fallen Monarchs, William Bliss Baker, 1886, Oil on Canvas, Brigham Young University Museum of Art

Fallen Monarchs, William Bliss Baker, 1886, Oil on Canvas, Brigham Young University Museum of Art

 

“This painting by William Bliss Baker received recognition from Alfred Trumble in his Representative Works of Contemporary American Artists published in 1887.

In his compilation, Trumble selected thirty of what he deemed the greatest works by the best living American artists, a grand praise for the not so well-known artist William Bliss Baker. Alfred Trumble proclaimed the ‘largest meaning’ in Fallen Monarchs to be ‘the story of eternal life and eternal decay.’

Trumble imbues Baker’s trees with near human sensibilities writing: ‘Stealing down through the tangle of thicket, half buried and lost here and there under the mantle of the passing year shakes down upon it, come the ghost of the stream whose moisture brings life to the overarching boughs, and feeds the branching rootlets with the sap they must send shooting up to the loftiest tendrils that shiver under the sky. Prone in their majesty the departed monarchs lie along it, as if imploring the vitality it can no longer give to them.’”

Excerpt from 150 Years of American Painting. Shop our prints of Fallen Monarchs.

 

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.