Nov 072013
 

 

New Carl Bloch Notecards

We are coming out with many new products for our upcoming exhibition, Sacred Gifts: The Religious Art of Carl Bloch, Heinrich Hofmann, and Frans Schwartz. The exhibition will open on November 15, 2013 and custom products will be arriving at the MOA Store throughout the first couple weeks of the show. Shop our new Carl Bloch notecards now:

Let the Little Children Come unto Me

Sermon on the Mount

The Shepherds and the Angel

Shop all Carl Bloch merchandise.

 

Nov 042013
 

 

Fallen Monarchs, William Bliss Baker, 1886, Oil on Canvas, Brigham Young University Museum of Art

Fallen Monarchs, William Bliss Baker, 1886, Oil on Canvas, Brigham Young University Museum of Art

 

“This painting by William Bliss Baker received recognition from Alfred Trumble in his Representative Works of Contemporary American Artists published in 1887.

In his compilation, Trumble selected thirty of what he deemed the greatest works by the best living American artists, a grand praise for the not so well-known artist William Bliss Baker. Alfred Trumble proclaimed the ‘largest meaning’ in Fallen Monarchs to be ‘the story of eternal life and eternal decay.’

Trumble imbues Baker’s trees with near human sensibilities writing: ‘Stealing down through the tangle of thicket, half buried and lost here and there under the mantle of the passing year shakes down upon it, come the ghost of the stream whose moisture brings life to the overarching boughs, and feeds the branching rootlets with the sap they must send shooting up to the loftiest tendrils that shiver under the sky. Prone in their majesty the departed monarchs lie along it, as if imploring the vitality it can no longer give to them.’”

Excerpt from 150 Years of American Painting. Shop our prints of Fallen Monarchs.

 

Oct 182013
 
Let the Little Children Come unto Me, Carl Heinrich Bloch, date unknown, Oil on Copper, The Museum of National History at Frederiksborg Castle

Let the Little Children Come unto Me, Carl Heinrich Bloch, date unknown, Oil on Copper, The Museum of National History at Frederiksborg Castle

Mark 10:13 – 16

13 And they brought young children to him, that he should touch them: and his disciples rebuked those that brought them. 14 But when Jesus saw it, he was much displeased, and said unto them, Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God. 15 Verily I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein. 16 And he took them up in his arms, put his hands upon them, and blessed them.

“In this painting, Jesus’ disciples seek to prevent the young from approaching the Savior.  But their efforts are met with the Savior’s response, “Suffer the little children to come unto me.” Here one young child slips unnoticed behind the Apostle.  The Savior gently holds the hand of a young boy and embraces another child. The children’s faces express a look of complete trust and contentment. As in many of Bloch’s paintings, a wide diversity of people is present-young and old, healthy and infirm, the believers and the merely curious. Above the Savior’s head is a richly woven fabric with long tassels. From the fifteenth century on, this “cloth of honor” appeared in artistic representations of important and powerful figures. It was most often hung in a long panel behind the person to represent his nobility or high rank. In this image, the cloth has been lifted up, perhaps as a sign of Christ’s openness as well as His nobility.”  Excerpt from The Master’s Hand: The Art of Carl Heinrich Bloch

Let the Little Children Come unto Me will be exhibited at BYU Museum of Art Sacred Gifts Exhibition November 15, 2013 through February 2014. Buy prints at the MOA Store.

 

Oct 092013
 

Halloween Display

Come by the MOA Store this month to browse our selection of fun Halloween items, including books, jewelry, and more!

Oct 022013
 
Lake Scene, Sanford Gifford, 1866, Oil on Canvas, Brigham Young University Museum of Art

Lake Scene, Sanford Gifford, 1866, Oil on Canvas, Brigham Young University Museum of Art

“The painting Lake Scene by Sanford Gifford, depicts a tranquil autumn landscape in the eastern United States.  Lake Scene may depict Lake Champlain from the Vermont side looking west toward New York.  The painting is specifically characteristic of Gifford in its use of hot colors and tinted atmospheric effects.  Atmosphere is a unifier of all features of the landscape, rather than a semi-obscuring veil.

As one takes a closer look, the painting’s empty foreground becomes strikingly apparent in what seemed at first glance to be a heavily foliated view.  Further inspection reveals two small figures in the left middle distance. They are constructing or mending a wall out of stone and logs, perhaps fashioned from the felled trees whose stumps are visible in the foreground.

Gifford’s painting is not merely a picturesque landscape.  The image portrays the American wilderness and it inevitable subjugation to the civilizing effects of a growing democracy. It is about primeval Eden that attracted many to its shores and the eventual nationalist fervor that took hold and reshaped it both literally and philosophically.  Consciously or not, Gifford’s work reflected an optimistic view. The work is ultimately about America in transition and, as such, is a study in contrasts-idealism and rationalism, progress and destruction, boundlessness and perimeters.”

Excerpt taken from 150 Years of American Painting

 

Come to the October First Friday event this Friday October 4th from 6-10pm at the MOA.

Purchase prints of Lake Scene.

Sep 262013
 
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Primary Association

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Primary Association, The Children’s Friend

A story told by Mahonri’s dear childhood friend Lee Greene Richards:

“I had gathered up a few choice pieces of wood which had fallen from the top of our old high posted fence. Hon (Mahonri) and I had bought a fifty cent set of wood carving tools, purchased at the Z.C.M.I. One day we decided to try our skill at wood carving. I remember very distinctly that the head Hon carved was of Julius Caesar; and when we had done our stuff, I took some gold bronze and painted them. Hon hurried home to show his mother his creation, which he had copied from a picture we found in a book. His mother gave it the place of honor, on the mantle in the parlor. One day a man called at the Young home to try and sell a subscription for an illustrated encyclopedia of useful household information. He noticed the gold bust on the mantle and picked it up and turned it around to study it from several angles. He inquired who had made it and, when told her son only eleven had carved it, the man was thrilled. “He is a genius,” were the man’s words. When Hon’s mother told him what the man had said, this pleased him. Hon was not slow to pass the good news to his companions. The story spread and soon the children were jokingly calling Mahonri Young “The Genius.”

Excerpt taken from “A Song of Joys: The Biography of Mahonri Mackintosh Young.”

Young’s work is currently on display in the Shaping America exhibitionShop Mahonri Young books and prints at the MOA Store.